Tag: Football

Under 16s game abandoned as match descends into chaos as Police are called

A junior football match descended into violence after a referee sent off parents at the weekend, the incident which occurred at Blackburn Central High School involving 2 U16s teams on Saturday sparked calls for police to attend

Police said they were called to the incident at around 10.50am after a fight broke out between approximately 20 people including both adults and children.

The incident at the school off Haslingden Road has also been reported to the Lancashire FA. Police said no arrests were made but several people were spoken to after the incident.

A police spokesman said: “A fight broke out at a youth football game between two local teams, It was a public order offence and around 20 people both adults and children were involved. Three people were identified by police and had to be spoken to about the incident, No arrests have been made at this stage.”

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On the Bolton, Bury and District Football League the match is listed as abandoned. The incident has been reported to the Local County FA and we understand there is a police investigation ongoing.

At this time we cannot comment further on the incident however we will update in due course.

Today’s reports are rare in comparison to the number of games played without incident. Although incidents of verbal abuse are currently at unacceptable levels and much more work needs to be addressed in this area, the reported levels of violence remains extremely low.

We know a lot of parents are passionate when watching their child play, and sadly that passion can manifest into incidents where referees have been verbally abused or anger has flared between parents.
This kind of behaviour can not and should not be condoned – however it is extremely rare to view extreme violence at a grassroots football match and there are a lot more positives associated with grassroots football that unfortunately does not get the coverage it deserves.

 

‘Why do I only come on if we’re winning by loads or losing by loads?’

So why did I want to be a football coach and what did I think I would get out of it? The answer is not as simple as you might think. Actually it’s a bloody tough one to consider but I’ll try and be as honest as I can. When a parent looks over and notices that their child is a substitute it’s not a nice feeling. No parent ever hopes that their child will not be in the starting line-up. Internally you rationalise that it will be one of life’s lessons, or you might tell yourself that it is in the interest of fairness, and everyone must accept that they can’t play every game. It’s a fair selection process, nothing more and next week it will be someone else’s turn to sit it out.

But if you see this happen week after week it starts to become an emotional burden and difficult to bear witness to. After all, you live with this budding Lionel Messi; you’re the one who notices where he’s put his favourite teams’ calendar pride of place just where he can see it before he goes to sleep at night in his bedroom. The excited young wide eyed boy that asks you if you think they’ll play today as he busily struggles to get his socks over his shin pads. When my own son was 8 I asked him what he wanted to do when he left school. He told me he’d be a bus driver through the week and play for Manchester City at weekend. Innocence is a beautiful thing in children; everything is so black and white. Life is simple and anything is possible. How utterly disheartening then when you see that it is your child, yet again that is keeping his squad jacket on, that is freezing on the touchline patiently waiting for his coach to tell him to get warmed up.

It’s even worse if your son like mine, is the sort who will just stand there until he’s told to warm up. He would never dream of asking his manager when he’s going on. The car journey on the way home becomes abject misery. At first you can tell them that they’ll get their chance eventually. Then you tell them if they work hard, and keep trying, their chance will come. Then if you’re stupid like me, you’ll tell them it’s because they are not working hard enough. Our journey from hell was after a game for under 11’s in December 2013. It was a miserable wet and cold slate grey Manchester morning. The team were at home entertaining a local rival. I looked over as the lads warmed up with Coach hoping that my son might finally get to start a game.

He wasn’t their best player but he wasn’t their worst either. Not that that should matter. The parents were huddled closer than might be considered comfortable due the biting wind that was driving the Manchester rain into our faces. We were cold but at least we were dressed for it. The lads on the pitch were ringing wet through even in their training coats, and by now as muddy as they would have been if they’d have just played a full game. The referee, who looked about 90, and had the whitest skin I’ve ever seen, seemed not to notice the weather at all and offered a casual ‘morning’ to the Captain and the clad ensemble of parents that were eager for the game to get going. ‘Ref any chance of 5 minutes each way in this?’ one of the parents shouted, but the ref didn’t respond he was busy getting his linesman flags out of his bag. It is at this point as a parent that you have got to have your wits about you.

If you’re caught off guard and not paying full attention, you will eventually look up to see a referees flag practically shoved up your nose, and a ‘appreciate that, thanks’ message from the ref who has spun so quickly on his haunches, you can’t even recall the moment you accepted the flag into your hand. So that’s what Derren Brown does with his Saturday mornings….. Any attempt to pass the flag on yourself is rendered futile because, at that moment as you look at all the other dads, you realise that you are actually alone, and every other man and his dog has retreated to a safe distance of roughly fifteen feet away. ‘You X%$?X’ I turn to my wife and say pathetically, ‘I’ve got to do the flag again’ ‘mmm, you’ve made more appearances with that flag than our son has played all season’. I look at her apologetically, ‘get someone else to do it for a change’ she instructs. The dads looked at me apologetically, but not apologetically enough to actually take the flag. Derren Brown’s whistle signals kick off, I hastily get into position as linesman and look around the pitch for my son. He isn’t there, I look over at Coach and, oh yes there he is, the one shivering behind the other three subs. The game was 1-1 at half time which I knew meant that he wouldn’t be coming on any time soon.

Most of the parents including my wife had retreated to the safety of some trees to shelter from the downpour. I however had official flag business to attend to. I stood miserable and cold on one side of the pitch while my son was no doubt doing the same on the other. The second half saw us score another goal with just 10 minutes left. Great for the team but not so great for the subs. Coach did his best to get the lads on before the final whistle which saw my sons stats as “played 60 seconds, touches 0” As I walked towards the ref to give him his flag I heard him say to my boy ‘well played there young un’. I didn’t speak to coach after the game and we didn’t wait for his team talk.

The three of us just trudged to the car wet through and freezing cold. In the car he started pushing all the right buttons, ‘Why am I sub every week? ‘Why do I only come on if we are winning by loads or losing by loads?’

Why why why….

He was right of course, why indeed?

But I was as fed up about it as he was. I didn’t want see other people’s kids playing football every week. And so I snapped, at my ten year old son, who just wanted to be in a team, play football and drive buses.

Anon

Respect – FA announce 75% discount off Respect equipment

The grassroots football season has begun with a huge and refreshed push by The FA and Football Foundation on the Respect scheme to ensure that football – both on and off the pitch – continues to be enjoyable, inclusive and a positive experience For All.

This scheme offers clubs, leagues and schools with the opportunity to purchase Respect equipment which, if used effectively, will help us to achieve this.

Equipment is currently available at a substantially discounted rate for only a six-week period. Each are able to take advantage now and apply for a voucher which offers a 75% discount, until 8 October 2017. From 9 October, the vouchers will revert back to a 50% discount.

Are you eligible?

The scheme is open to:

  • FA affiliated clubs
  • FA affiliated leagues
  • Schools based in England

You may submit one application to the scheme per season.

Complete the application form

We accept applications to the Respect scheme all year round.

In order to complete the application form you will need a valid affiliation number for your club or league, or your school’s Edubase number.

Please complete the Respect Equipment Application form to apply for a voucher.

Complete the Respect Equipment Application form

Mini Soccer Summer Festival Under 8’s

Tournament Name: Mini Soccer Summer Festival Under 8’s
Tournament Date: 27/08/2017
Tournament Organiser: Micky Tully
Tournament Web Address: www.goalsfootball.co.uk
Team Age Groups: Under 8’s
Entry Fee per team: £15.00
Tournament Email Address: newcastle@goalsfootball.co.uk
Address 1: Goals Newcastle
Address 2: High Gosforth Park
Town: Newcastle Upon Tyne
Post Code: NE3 5HP
Tournament Image: Slide1_nd1yv9.jpg
Tournament Information: Summer Festival will run from 10am-2pm, Food & Drinks available throughout the event, Free parking onsite, Winners/Runners up trophies & medals.

RUTHERFORD AFC U7’S AND 8’S

Tournament Name: Rutherford AFC
Tournament Date: 27/08/2017
Tournament Organiser: steve graham
Tournament Web Address: www.rutherfordfc.co.uk
Team Age Groups: Under 7’s, Under 8’s
Entry Fee per team: £25
Tournament Email Address: steveg1985@aol.com
Address 1: farnacres, coach road
Address 2: Lobley Hill
Town: Gateshead
Post Code: ne11 0hh
Tournament Information: under 7s 9-1
under 8s 1-5
hot foot available
free parking

Allendale Junior Football Festival

Tournament Name: Allendale Junior Football Festival
Tournament Date: 05/08/2017
Tournament Organiser: John Martin
Tournament Web Address: www.allendalefootballclub.co.uk
Team Age Groups: Under 8’s, Under 9’s, Under 10’s, Under 11’s, Under 14’s
Entry Fee per team: 30
Tournament Email Address: allendalefootballclub@gmail.com
Address 1: Allendale Sports CLub
Address 2: Allen Mill Cottages
Town: Allendale (Hexham)
Post Code: NE47 9EQ
Tournament Image: U8_sm3wkk.jpg
Tournament Information: We are looking to run separate competitions for each of the following age groups:

Under 8s, 9s, 10s, 11s & 14s – Please note that the age groups are based on next season’s (2017/18).

Format of 5 aside for the under 8s and 7 aside for the remaining age groups.

Maximum squad sizes will be 10 per team.

As in previous years, we’ll structure the day in two halves with several of the age groups playing simultaneously in the morning and then the other age groups in the afternoon. Once we’ve got a feel for numbers of teams for each age group we’ll communicate if they are playing in the morning or afternoon session. When you are submitting your team entry, please specify if you prefer morning or afternoon and we will try to accommodate where possible.

Start time for the morning session is usually around 9.30am and 1.00pm for the afternoon, with the whole day wrapped up by 5.00pm.

The cost of entering will be £30 per team.

In order to secure a place, can I ask that you kindly

1.confirm by email if you wish to enter a team(s) and for which age groups (please note these should be based on next season’s age group)

I will write again just after the 8th July to confirm your place and finalised format.

Inclusive Utd introduces thousands to football

More than 3,000 disabled people have become involved in football as a result of FA-led grassroots project, Inclusive United.

A joint partnership between The FA and Wembley National Stadium Trust, Inclusive United was set up to engage and sustain the participation of disabled people in football by offering greater and more inclusive opportunities to become physically active in London.

Back in 2012, 15 of the capital’s professional football clubs’ community trusts – including Arsenal Community, Leyton Orient Trust and the Tottenham Hotspur Foundation – came together to form a partnership, which was subsequently tasked with delivery of the Inclusive United project.

In Numbers

  • £430,000 – Funds invested over three years by The FA and WNST
  • 3,057 – disabled individuals have taken part
  • 150 – 20-week programmes delivered across 12 professional clubs
  • 81 – new teams created

Since then – between 2013 and 2016 – 150 separate programmes have been delivered across 12 professional football clubs.

In addition, 81 new teams have been created and the project has enabled 613 trained individuals to increase and improve opportunities for disabled people through coaching and mentoring.

Fiona Kingsley, a children’s occupational therapy clinical lead, working with the Leyton Orient Trust, said: “Setting up the Red Dragons Football Club for children with Developmental Coordination Disorder has been an incredible journey for our occupational therapy team, from the initial idea of the club to winning the Inclusive Sports Award at the Waltham Forest Sport Awards.

“The club has brought enormous benefits to the children and their families and demonstrates how interagency working and the bringing together of expertise really helps to meet the needs of this vulnerable group of children.”

It is hoped that the Inclusive United project will create a lasting legacy with sustainable opportunities for disabled people to take part in football through ongoing recreational sessions, links to local competitions and performance pathways.

EFL to trial new penalty format 17/18 – Penalty shootouts may never be the same again

The EFL is to support the trial of a reformed format for penalty kicks, by introducing the new ‘ABBA’ penalty shootout formula into EFL competitions during the 2017/18 season.

The new system, which is currently being supported internationally by FIFA and in some European competitions through UEFA, will see the new ‘ABBA’ penalty shootout system adopted for this season’s Carabao Cup, Checkatrade Trophy and Sky Bet Play-Offs as an alternative to the traditional ABAB pattern.

The trial of the new system is being backed by the International Football Association Board (IFAB) in response to a hypothesis that the player taking the second kick is under greater mental pressure in the current format. Therefore, a different order of kickers will be trialled in an experiment to reduce any apparent advantage the team taking the first kick may have.

In simple terms, the team taking the first kick in each ‘pair’ of kicks will alternate as follows.

Both teams to take five kicks unless knock-out process is required.

1st kick – Team A           2nd kick – Team B

3rd kick – Team B           4th kick – Team A

5th kick – Team A           6th kick – Team B

7th kick – Team B           8th kick – Team A

9th kick – Team A           10th kick – Team B

11th kick – Team B         12th kick – Team A and so on…

Shaun Harvey, EFL Chief Executive said: “We welcome innovation at the EFL and I am pleased to see that the EFL is able to play its part in an important development for football.

“IFAB have identified a theory that the current arrangements for penalty kicks potentially provide an unfair advantage to the team taking the first kick so we are keen to see if the new system has an impact on one of the most discussed issues in football.

“We all want football matches to be decided in a fair and consistent manner and I am sure the new system will add an interesting dynamic to the conclusion of matches in our competitions if required.”

The first round of this season’s Carabao Cup will present the first potential opportunity for the new system to come into use in EFL competitions, with games scheduled to take place on Tuesday 8th, Wednesday 9th and Thursday 10th August.

Have we forgotten what kids football is for?

It’s really sad that people have forgotten what kids football is really about.

  • Is it about winning at all costs? No!
  • Is it about politics between parents/coaches? No!

We know, the same as in a lot of life situations that some children are more talented than others in sport. The same as I know there are people out there that are better brain surgeons than me.

Should we make the children feel inadequate because of this? Absolutely not! Should we involve the children in club rivalry? No! Should there even be club rivalry at grassroots level??!! As long as they’re playing and having the time of their life’s getting caked in mud on a Sunday morning.. what else matters?

We’re draining the life’s out of these kids week in week out.. The question is would I love my children and be any more proud of them than I am now if they were to be signed to an academy tomorrow..? The answer to that is.. I couldn’t possibly love or be more proud of my children no matter what they do!

I have a son that is a goalkeeper that makes some actual WORLD CLASS saves that I couldn’t..even if I tried stop myself.. and he thinks nothing of scoring goal kicks every now and then.. does he make mistakes.. yes… don’t we all!! But he loves what he does! And so do I!! I have another son.. that takes free kicks like I’ve never seen a 7 year old child take before, he’d put Beckham to shame and that’s not even being biased it’s been said by many people.. is he the strongest player on the pitch? No.. But do I burst with pride every time he touches the ball.. yes!

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I have a TEAM full of players that have their own unique little things that make my Sundays and hopefully their Sundays amazing.. are they lucky to have me as their coach… No.. I’m the lucky one!! I don’t vision that we’re going to go on and be world beaters but that doesn’t mean them nor I don’t put the effort in each week purely on the basis that we love the game! No matter what, I can say I’ve taken part in their DEVELOPMENT not only as football players.. but actual human beings as well.

We have a right old laugh week in week out.. At the end of most games they’ll literally come and pile on me and bring tears to my eyes with the little smiles on their faces beaming up at me, hanging on my every word.

It doesn’t end there.. as I don’t just run a team.. I run a club.. and everyone that is part of our club I am proud of.. more so the kids.. after all.. they are what make it!! Let’s give them something back! They are not machines….please for the love of god stop treating them this way!

Yours sincerely,

Disheartened grassroots football manager.

3 points at what cost !! Will I sacrifice player participation for the win…..

I never wrote a match report on Saturday!

Why ?

Because I was more interested in the physiological effect the 3 points would impact on me as coach. I always revisit games for days afterwards in my head.

The what if’s, the buts, the why’s and when’s. How can I help the children for next week. Unlike any other week this week was extra important. I needed to ask myself what impact the 3 points had over being fair.

Did the win sacrifice player participation? Luckily the answer is No. But it quite easily could have. I learnt of the added pressure for 3 points. Why ? Parent pressure, league pressure, team/club rivalry. Ex coaches showing their abundance of trophies at that level.

The only people not to accept any pressure is the children. They just want to play football and have fun, right ? If I was guilty of one thing it was taking the ownership away from the kids. I pigeon holed them into their best positions, I got lost in the environment and focused on 3 points. Do I feel great for it ? No and neither do the kids.

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They don’t care about the 3 points. Don’t get me wrong wanting to win is perfectly natural, but kids would rather play and lose than warm the bench and win Roll on next week, back to full player ownership.

Athletes learn by doing, not by watching ! Don’t deprive children the opportunity to learn. Once the 3 points take priority excluding and demoralising a child in the process by turning them into part playing bench warmers it’s time to step down as a coach and go home.

 

 

Cwmbran Town AFC Festival

Tournament Name: Cwmbran Town AFC Festival
Tournament Date: 09/07/2017
Tournament Organiser: Mark Williams
Tournament Web Address: www.cwmbrantownafc.co.uk
Team Age Groups: Under 7’s, Under 8’s, Under 9’s, Under 10’s, Under 11’s, Under 12’s, Under 13’s
Entry Fee per team: £25-£35
Tournament Email Address: mkwsparky@hotmail.com
Address 1: Penylan Fields
Address 2: Cord Eva
Town: Cwmbran
Post Code: NP446UA
Tournament Information: Sunday 9th July
U6s, u7s, u8s
Saturday 15th July
U9s u10s u11s
Sunday 16th July
U12s and u13s

Ages 6s to 11s will get a trophy
12s and 13s will be a tournament only winners and runners up will get trophies

There will be BBQ, bouncy castle, ice cream can, sweat stalks.

Parking provided at a local school.

Hope to see you on the day

A Coaches worth is found in the impact that they have on their players lives.

A coaches worth isn’t found in their win/loss record or on the resume of which team they have coached, it is found in the impact that they have on their players lives.

 “A good coach takes his love for the game and instills it in you. They mould you into the player they see inside of you and watch your talent and dedication grow into a skill that you both can be proud of. Coaches payoff is the smile they see when you’ve reached your goal. Their drive is the tears you cry because you want it so bad, knowing that he has the same feeling inside him is what motivates the player”

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A good coach often without realising or even trying when will help a child fall in love with the game they love and hopefully have a lifelong involvement in some capacity be it playing, coaching, refereeing etc.

Instilling the value of teamwork, sportsmanship, integrity, honesty and respect are equally important into a child’s outlook on sport and life.

Thanks Coach only £5.99

Children should look back in adulthood at there grassroots years with fondness and remember there coach, most will hold there coach in high regard.

Speaking from personal experience I can honestly say my years playing grassroots were fantastic, made so by my coach. A man I still look up to, the first person in my thoughts when I need advice and the first person I will ring for a beer.

Because you see a coaches worth isn’t found in their win/loss record or on the resume of which team they have coached, it is found in the impact that they have on their players lives.