Tag: the FA

BREAKING – THE FA AND FOOTBALL FOUNDATION LAUNCH £300,000 FUTSAL FUND

The Football Association and Football Foundation have today (Monday 18 September) launched a £300,000 fund aimed at developing the sport of Futsal in England.

  • Equipment, coaching and referee starter packs made available to boost the sport
  • Fund aims to create more Futsal leagues and competitions across the country
  • Applications are now open and close on Friday 6 October

 Futsal is a five-a-side game, normally played on a flat indoor pitch with hockey-sized goals and a size-four ball that has a reduced bounce. The exciting, fast-paced sport is played across the world and is officially recognised by both UEFA and FIFA.

County FAs, youth football leagues, youth Futsal leagues, schools (excluding primary level), senior colleges and sixth forms are being encouraged to apply for a ‘Futsal starter pack’, which includes Futsal-specific equipment including goals, balls and bibs, as well as FA accredited coaching and refereeing courses.

The starter packs are designed to adapt existing sports halls, playgrounds and other hard surface facilities by providing new and existing players with the necessary tools and skills to develop and maintain Futsal leagues, competitions and fixtures across the country. Applications are now open and close at 5pm on Friday 6 October. 

Specifically, applications in the following categories will be prioritised:

  • Female Futsal (12-18 years)
  • Youth Futsal (14 years-and-over)
  • Youth football leagues (U14-to-U18)
  • Association of Colleges (AoC) members with facilities offering community usage
  • English Schools’ Football Association (ESFA) and Independent Schools Football Association (ISFA) member schools with facilities offering community usage

The scheme will be delivered by the Football Foundation, the nation’s largest sports charity. As well as delivering Grow the Game, the Football Foundation delivers the Premier League & The FA Facilities Fund on behalf of the Premier League, The FA and the Government, through Sport England. Since 2000, the Foundation has supported over 15,000 grassroots projects worth more than £1.4bn.

Michael Skubala, England Futsal Head Coach, said: “The FA recognises Futsal’s increasing importance and popularity. Through our partnership with the Football Foundation, the fund is a fantastic way to celebrate and start to grow the sport in this country. We want to see more players playing the sport in new leagues and competitions, and I would encourage all those who are eligible to apply for the scheme by Friday 6 October.

“Futsal is a sport in its own right with its own pathway to becoming an England International. Futsal also promotes and practices both inclusivity and diversity – it is a sport for players and coaches from different genders, ethnic backgrounds, faiths, ages, sexual orientations and the disabled.”

 

Paul Thorogood, Football Foundation CEO, said: “The Football Foundation is delighted to be delivering this funding scheme on The FA’s behalf. We want to see more people playing Futsal, so these starter packs are great news for those looking to take up the sport. The application deadline is Friday 6 October and anyone who thinks they are eligible should visit our website to find out more information on the scheme.”

To apply for a Futsal starter pack, please visit the Football Foundation website.

 

Respect – FA announce 75% discount off Respect equipment

The grassroots football season has begun with a huge and refreshed push by The FA and Football Foundation on the Respect scheme to ensure that football – both on and off the pitch – continues to be enjoyable, inclusive and a positive experience For All.

This scheme offers clubs, leagues and schools with the opportunity to purchase Respect equipment which, if used effectively, will help us to achieve this.

Equipment is currently available at a substantially discounted rate for only a six-week period. Each are able to take advantage now and apply for a voucher which offers a 75% discount, until 8 October 2017. From 9 October, the vouchers will revert back to a 50% discount.

Are you eligible?

The scheme is open to:

  • FA affiliated clubs
  • FA affiliated leagues
  • Schools based in England

You may submit one application to the scheme per season.

Complete the application form

We accept applications to the Respect scheme all year round.

In order to complete the application form you will need a valid affiliation number for your club or league, or your school’s Edubase number.

Please complete the Respect Equipment Application form to apply for a voucher.

Complete the Respect Equipment Application form

FA Breaking News !!!!! Subsidised Defibrillators for Football Clubs

The British Heart Foundation (BHF) and The Football Association (The FA) are calling on grassroots and amateur football clubs in England to help save more lives from cardiac arrests by installing lifesaving defibrillators.

Less than 1 in 10 people survive an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in the UK.

You can help beat those odds by applying for a defibrillator.

The Football Association (FA) and The British Heart Foundation (BHF) have worked in partnership to award a grant for two-thirds of the cost of a defibrillator. This means your club will only pay £318 (+VAT)

We have already placed 640 defibrillators in football clubs across the UK and we now have 900 more available for clubs in the National League System, Women’s Pyramid of Football Clubs and Charter Standard Clubs. So, this is a great opportunity to get one for your club.

Once your application is approved you will be given instructions on how to pay your £318 + VAT. You will receive your defibrillator once we have received the money from your club.

 

Further information

The BHF and The FA have already helped part-fund and place around 600 defibrillators at grassroots clubs across the country and are now inviting applications from clubs operating within the National League System, Women’s Pyramid of Football or Charter Standard Programme for a further 900 available.

Lisa Hodgson, FA Medical Education Lead, said: “The FA continues to recognise the importance of providing timely and appropriate emergency first aid following casualties at footballing activities.

“Alongside our partners at the British Heart Foundation and WEL Medical, we are supplementing our CPR training by providing an excellent opportunity to receive equipment that could mean all the difference in a potentially life-threatening situation. I would implore football clubs across the country to apply.”

Research shows that over 90% of sudden cardiac arrests in young athletes happen either during or immediately after exercise (1) and those with an inherited heart condition can be up to three times as likely to suffer a sudden cardiac arrest if they participate in intensive or strenuous exercise (2).

At least three fatalities occurred during football matches or training this year in England due to cardiac arrest, including former England international Ugo Ehiogu who died whilst working as coach at Tottenham Hotspur FC. A cardiac arrest is when a person’s heart stops pumping blood around their body and to their brain. It causes the person to fall unconscious and stop breathing, or stop breathing normally.

For every minute without CPR and defibrillation, a person’s chance of survival decreases by around 10 per cent (3). A defibrillator is an automatic device that can be used by the public to shock the heart back into a normal rhythm during cardiac arrest. By performing CPR and using a defibrillator until an ambulance arrives, you can help double the victim’s chance of survival.

Simon Gillespie, Chief Executive at the British Heart Foundation, said: “Sadly there are hundreds of thousands of people in the UK with a faulty gene which puts them at risk of sudden death from a cardiac arrest.

“When someone collapses on the football pitch and their heart stops, the next few seconds are absolutely critical. Every minute without CPR and defibrillation can reduce their chance of survival by ten per cent.

“Defibrillators can be the difference between life and death, which is why we’re urging football clubs across England to apply for this vital equipment and have it nearby in case of an emergency.”

There are around 30,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in England every year. However, fewer than one in ten people survive (4).

You can apply for a defibrillator by visiting: www.footballdefibs.org

The FA Announce Guide to Improving Match Day for Children

We can all help children enjoy football more by creating the right environment.

That is why The FA has produced an easy-to-follow guide to help improve the matchday experience for younger players.

From introducing codes of conduct to simply providing refreshments, the guide offers plenty of tips to help every volunteer, coach or manager of a grassroots youth team.

There has never been as many youth teams (over 62,000) playing across the country and we can all do our bit to ensure our young players stay in love with the game.

USEFUL RESOURCES

Get your FREE guide HERE

Criminal record checks for those working with children

Criminal Record Checks (CRC) in Football

The FA’s Policy

As part of our safeguarding children strategy, The FA requires those working in eligible* roles with children and young people to pass a criminal records check. This is in line with legislation and government guidance and is standard practice.

We provide the framework and guidance for Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) checks in football and the leagues and clubs then have to implement this to ensure that those who are required to have checks done, do so.

The majority of checks are processed electronically, ensuring that people can be confirmed to work with children and young people swiftly. Where the check highlights relevant information, this is investigated further and a risk assessment is carried out to establish whether or not they will be accepted to work with children and young people in football.

Activities that require a check (Eligibility)
* Eligibility is governed by legislation and government guidance. In brief this means, anyone aged 16 years or over who undertakes any unsupervised roles with children and young people under the age of 18.

These activities include managing, training, coaching and supervising as well as giving advice or guidance on well-being, caring for children or driving a vehicle solely for children on behalf of a club or organisation. In youth football all coaches and managers must hold a current, FA accepted check. This is part of the affiliation criteria for youth football.

Anyone undertaking these activities in football MUST obtain a DBS Enhanced Criminal Record with Children’s Barred List Check.  Role specific guidance for clubs, coaches referees and FA licensed tutors is hosted below along with the CRC eligibility criteria guidance document.

You may have more than one role in football but you only need one check to cover all your roles in affiliated grassroots football.  Please note that this may be different if seeking work with professional clubs.

Guidance on how to get a check
Select the activity in which you have the most frequent contact with U18s from the table below and follow up with the relevant contact point:

Your role in football

  • Grassroots U18s coach, manager, first aider or any other club based eligible role

Speak to your club welfare officer

 

  • Club welfare officer, youth league welfare officer

Speak to your CFA welfare officer

 

  • Referee, referee mentor, referee coach, referee assessor and referee tutor in U18 football

Contact your CFA referee development officer

 

  • Licensed coach applicant

Call 0845 210 8080 or email FAChecks@TheFA.com for advice

 

  • Working in a private soccer school or unaffiliated football

You may not be able to get an FA enhanced CRC – speak to your line manager or call 0845 210 8080 or email FAChecks@TheFA.com for advice

 

  • Working in a Premier League club

Contact the designated safeguarding officer at your Club

 

  • Working in an English Football League Club

Contact the Designated Safeguarding Officer at your Club, or contact 0845 210 8080 or email FAChecks@TheFA.com for advice

 

  • Unsure what you should be doing

Call 0845 210 8080 or email FAChecks@TheFA.com for advice

 

Click here for a full list of County FA contacts

Applying for electronic checks is straightforward. For applicant guidance click here and verifiers guidance click here.

Current costs for checks

You are Administration fee paper application method Administration fee online application method Government charge Total
A Volunteer  £20  £10  Nil  £20 or £10 depending on application method
Not a Volunteer  £20  £10  £44  £64 or £54 depending on application method

Paper-based CRC application forms option are available, where online applications cannot be made.

Tracking who has completed checks and training at club level
The FA online Safeguarding Service (click here) enables club welfare officers (CWOs) and assistant CWOs to track and manage club members who are required to do a check and safeguarding children training.

To register your club to use the online disclosures CRC service or to make enquiries not covered by the guidance provided here, please click here or  contact FAchecks@TheFA.com or call 0845 210 8080 and The FA Criminal Records Body will be happy to assist.

 

New “cheating” laws announced by the FA

THE FOOTBALL ASSOCIATION is cracking down on cheats by introducing two-match bans for diving.

And the new law will come into effect from this Friday with the Championship’s first game.

The sanctions will come into place from Sunderland’s Championship home match with Derby County at the Stadium of Light on Friday, the first game of the new league season, but the idea has been on the agenda for a year.

The authorities will thereby seek to punish incidents that involve clear and overwhelming evidence of simulation, and that had significant consequence on the outcome of a match. It is thereby seen as worthy of a greater punishment than a player actually getting caught by the referee in a match, since the former is successful and the second is attempted.

So, if a player is believed to have dived to win a penalty or get an opposition player sent off, that will go to review that could well see a two-game ban.

Any player who is mistakenly sent off as a result of an opponent diving will have their red card overturned, and the FA will also increase the length of bans for recurring offenders.

 

 

Inclusive Utd introduces thousands to football

More than 3,000 disabled people have become involved in football as a result of FA-led grassroots project, Inclusive United.

A joint partnership between The FA and Wembley National Stadium Trust, Inclusive United was set up to engage and sustain the participation of disabled people in football by offering greater and more inclusive opportunities to become physically active in London.

Back in 2012, 15 of the capital’s professional football clubs’ community trusts – including Arsenal Community, Leyton Orient Trust and the Tottenham Hotspur Foundation – came together to form a partnership, which was subsequently tasked with delivery of the Inclusive United project.

In Numbers

  • £430,000 – Funds invested over three years by The FA and WNST
  • 3,057 – disabled individuals have taken part
  • 150 – 20-week programmes delivered across 12 professional clubs
  • 81 – new teams created

Since then – between 2013 and 2016 – 150 separate programmes have been delivered across 12 professional football clubs.

In addition, 81 new teams have been created and the project has enabled 613 trained individuals to increase and improve opportunities for disabled people through coaching and mentoring.

Fiona Kingsley, a children’s occupational therapy clinical lead, working with the Leyton Orient Trust, said: “Setting up the Red Dragons Football Club for children with Developmental Coordination Disorder has been an incredible journey for our occupational therapy team, from the initial idea of the club to winning the Inclusive Sports Award at the Waltham Forest Sport Awards.

“The club has brought enormous benefits to the children and their families and demonstrates how interagency working and the bringing together of expertise really helps to meet the needs of this vulnerable group of children.”

It is hoped that the Inclusive United project will create a lasting legacy with sustainable opportunities for disabled people to take part in football through ongoing recreational sessions, links to local competitions and performance pathways.

Have we forgotten what kids football is for?

It’s really sad that people have forgotten what kids football is really about.

  • Is it about winning at all costs? No!
  • Is it about politics between parents/coaches? No!

We know, the same as in a lot of life situations that some children are more talented than others in sport. The same as I know there are people out there that are better brain surgeons than me.

Should we make the children feel inadequate because of this? Absolutely not! Should we involve the children in club rivalry? No! Should there even be club rivalry at grassroots level??!! As long as they’re playing and having the time of their life’s getting caked in mud on a Sunday morning.. what else matters?

We’re draining the life’s out of these kids week in week out.. The question is would I love my children and be any more proud of them than I am now if they were to be signed to an academy tomorrow..? The answer to that is.. I couldn’t possibly love or be more proud of my children no matter what they do!

I have a son that is a goalkeeper that makes some actual WORLD CLASS saves that I couldn’t..even if I tried stop myself.. and he thinks nothing of scoring goal kicks every now and then.. does he make mistakes.. yes… don’t we all!! But he loves what he does! And so do I!! I have another son.. that takes free kicks like I’ve never seen a 7 year old child take before, he’d put Beckham to shame and that’s not even being biased it’s been said by many people.. is he the strongest player on the pitch? No.. But do I burst with pride every time he touches the ball.. yes!

Download the Grassroots Report It APP Here

I have a TEAM full of players that have their own unique little things that make my Sundays and hopefully their Sundays amazing.. are they lucky to have me as their coach… No.. I’m the lucky one!! I don’t vision that we’re going to go on and be world beaters but that doesn’t mean them nor I don’t put the effort in each week purely on the basis that we love the game! No matter what, I can say I’ve taken part in their DEVELOPMENT not only as football players.. but actual human beings as well.

We have a right old laugh week in week out.. At the end of most games they’ll literally come and pile on me and bring tears to my eyes with the little smiles on their faces beaming up at me, hanging on my every word.

It doesn’t end there.. as I don’t just run a team.. I run a club.. and everyone that is part of our club I am proud of.. more so the kids.. after all.. they are what make it!! Let’s give them something back! They are not machines….please for the love of god stop treating them this way!

Yours sincerely,

Disheartened grassroots football manager.

FA Announcement – Regulation Amendments 2017/18 Season

Find out which rules have changed

The FA have released their Regulation Amendments for the 2017/18 football season.

Click here to download the Regulation Amendments 2017/18 in full

This document is intended to provide a brief overview of the key Regulation Amendments for 2017/18 season for all Clubs operating at Step 5 and below (County FA football).

Please refer to The FA or County FA handbook for the rule in its entirety and all other changes that may affect you.

This is not intended to replace the Association handbook.

In addition to this, the Discipline Handbook will be released in due course.

Categories include:

  • Separation of FA Offences and CFA Offences
  • Suspension Start Dates
  • Late Payment & Response Update
  • County FA Discipline Commissions
  • Appealing a County FA Decision
  • Mandatory Minimum Sanctions
  • Serious Offences and Suspensions
  • Football Debt Recovery

 

3 points at what cost !! Will I sacrifice player participation for the win…..

I never wrote a match report on Saturday!

Why ?

Because I was more interested in the physiological effect the 3 points would impact on me as coach. I always revisit games for days afterwards in my head.

The what if’s, the buts, the why’s and when’s. How can I help the children for next week. Unlike any other week this week was extra important. I needed to ask myself what impact the 3 points had over being fair.

Did the win sacrifice player participation? Luckily the answer is No. But it quite easily could have. I learnt of the added pressure for 3 points. Why ? Parent pressure, league pressure, team/club rivalry. Ex coaches showing their abundance of trophies at that level.

The only people not to accept any pressure is the children. They just want to play football and have fun, right ? If I was guilty of one thing it was taking the ownership away from the kids. I pigeon holed them into their best positions, I got lost in the environment and focused on 3 points. Do I feel great for it ? No and neither do the kids.

Download the Grassroots Report It APP Here

They don’t care about the 3 points. Don’t get me wrong wanting to win is perfectly natural, but kids would rather play and lose than warm the bench and win Roll on next week, back to full player ownership.

Athletes learn by doing, not by watching ! Don’t deprive children the opportunity to learn. Once the 3 points take priority excluding and demoralising a child in the process by turning them into part playing bench warmers it’s time to step down as a coach and go home.

 

 

TOP 10 TIPS: HOW TO GET PLAYERS AGED 5-12 READY FOR THE NEW SEASON

With teams returning back to training over the next few weeks, Pete Sturgess, FA National Coach for players aged 5-11, outlines ten top-tips to help get young players ready for the new season.

The tips below are based on guidance from the England DNA Foundation Phase project – which you can read more about below –  and are aimed at those working with young players aged 5-12 for a six week period before the season starts.

1) You’re coaching children, not adults

Getting young children ready for the new season is not the same as the preparation an adult player might be involved in. Pre-season for adults has long been associated with running laps and doing ‘doggies’ until exhaustion. If you are coaching children you must allow all sessions to be enjoyable, exciting and active. This should also be the aim at any stage of the season, not just through the summer.

2) Use fun movement activities

Warm-ups for our young players should be engaging, enjoyable and active. Look to include a wide range of movements and activities that are fun to be involved in such as running, chasing, dodging, jumping, twisting and turning. Get the children laughing and out of breath.  Include throwing and catching where you can. Games like tag rugby or dodgeball are great warm-ups.

3) The ball

All players attend training so they can play football and have lots of touches of the ball. Make sure you use the ball in your sessions as much as possible.

4) Play a variety of games

Play lots of small-sided games using different numbers of players and on pitches of different sizes. Getting the players playing matches is a great thing to include early on in both an individual session and in the six week programme.  Try and play the format of football you play on matchday- this might be 6v6 or 7v7.

5) Big group, big area

During the first couple of weeks find time to involve all the players as one big group (or two smaller groups) working in larger areas. This lowers the intensity at the start of pre-season and eases the players back into action.

6) Make things harder as the weeks go on

Smaller groups in smaller areas can be introduced as the weeks progress. 4v4 would be perfect after week three(particularly if for the previous two weeks you have played 6v6 or even 7v7). For each session think about how you can make it slightly harder for the players by increasing the time spent on the task.

7) Create individual challenges

Respect each child as an individual and adapt the session or challenge for them. Over the six weeks (and throughout the season) try to pair or group players together for different outcomes so that their individual needs are met more often.

8) Add variety

 If you train more than once a week, try to vary the kind of things you work on during sessions. Try to change the session theme so that the players are not always undertaking the same repetitive actions.

9) Concise communication followed by chance to practise

With all the activities and games you use try to give small amounts of clear and simple help and advice followed by lots of opportunities for the players to practise. Always add lots of encouragement.

10) Make sure that the players want to come back

It is very important that your summer sessions involve play, enjoyment and football. Playing games in training is vital so get the group into small-sided games as much as possible. Create something so special that the players cannot wait for the next session.

This article was originally created for The FA’s England DNA Foundation Phase project

FA Announcement – 32 Grassroots Leagues to trial Sin Bins this Season

FOR THE 2017-18 SEASON 32 GRASSROOTS LEAGUES WILL TRIAL TEMPORARY DISMISSALS

The Football Association has today announced the 32 grassroots leagues that will trial Temporary Dismissals – more commonly known as ‘sin bins’ – during the 2017-18 season.

From Step 7 of the National League system and below 130 grassroots leagues registered an interest in the pilot scheme and a mixture of male, female, adult, youth, Saturday and Sunday leagues across the country have been chosen to take part.

The scheme was originally conceived following a decision by the International Football Association Board [IFAB] which gave National Associations the ability to implement sin bins at grassroots level.

Whilst given discretion whether to use the scheme for all cautions, or selected cautions, The FA chose to focus on matters of dissent, which amounted to 25 per cent of all cautions during the 2016-17 season and directly supports the Respect programme.

It is anticipated that the pilot scheme will deal with misconduct on the day, result in fewer cautions for dissent overall and improve match-day experiences, not only for referees, but for all involved in the game.

Mark Ives, FA head of judicial services, said: “I am encouraged by the level of enthusiasm from County FA’s, leagues, clubs and referees and in their collective commitment to make a difference to our great game at a local level.

“I look forward to seeing a positive impact during the course of the season.”

The leagues below have been selected:

• Anglian Combination League • Jersey Football Combination
• Army Football League Massey • JJ Jones Builders Duchy League
• Birmingham & District Football League • Liverpool County FA Premier League
• Bolton, Bury & District Football League • Mid Sussex Football League
• Chester & Wirral Football League • Mid Sussex Youth & Minor Football League
• Cumberland County League • Midwest Counties Female
• Devon and Exeter Football League • North Staffs Youth League
• Dorset Premier League • Nottinghamshire Senior Football League
• Durham County Women’s • Notts. Amateur Alliance
• Evesham & District Sunday Football League • Peterborough & District Football League
• Gloucestershire County Women’s League • Potteries & District Sunday League
• Gloucestershire Northern Senior League • Sevenoaks and District Football League
• Hertfordshire Senior County League • Sheffield & District Junior Sunday League
• Hitchin Sunday League • Southern Amateur League
• Surrey Primary Youth League • Trelawny League
• Taunton & District Saturday League • Warrington Sunday Football League